Indigeneity, Contingency, and Cognitive Shifts

Authors

  • Kelema Moses

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17454/ARDETH06.10

Keywords:

Indigenous epistemologies, (de)colonization, collaboration

Abstract

Straying away from contingent forces that are an inherent part of architecture is a missed opportunity to incorporate multivalent imaginaries that allow for change and flexibility in architectural production. This article maintains that Indigenous voices in the construction of built environments and in the study of architectural histories allow for a (re)imagining of the transformative potential of contemporary architecture. First Nation, Native American, and Pacific Islander epistemologies decenter Western conceptions about architecture’s ordered and universalizing qualities and, instead, allow for ways of knowing that emphasize the interconnectedness (physical, social, emotional, spiritual, and intellectual) between people and landscapes. The essay further maintains that embracing cognitive diversity through collaborative partnerships will result in innovative design solutions to address twenty-first century issues related to climate change and the creation of inclusive communities that uplift societies.      

Published

2020-10-12

Issue

Section

Articles